Lost in a Fantasy World
18 years old. ABC-well in technicality, american born taiwanese, but whatever. Just trying to get through life. SENIOR YEAR IS HERE!!!!
Extra Pages and Navigation under construction
Updating my about me page, because it is lacking the about me part at this moment.
Art page will be uploaded soon, once my IB Art Exam is over and done with. Like, seriously, this school year needs to be done now.
enchanted
by my thoughts, dreams, hopes, and more

derekstilinski:

I just wanted to make Merlin and Arthur in suits together, and it turned into an AU where the whole gang keeps a journal of the planning of their wedding. Arthur spilled coffee on the main photo page early in the morning while he was trying to assemble a flower crown for Merlin to wear because he’s royalty to him if no one else.

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

tags → #save for later 
tags → #pretty #seascape 

I’ve had a lot of worries in my life, most of which never happened.

Mark Twain  (via hefuckin)

(Source: psych-quotes)

tags → #quotes 

(Source: gimmespencer)

dirudo:

katara:

This is the guy that played Neville in Harry Potter.

i like his new wand 

(Source: hombresdesnudo2)

This is my skin. It keeps out the rain and words I’d rather not hear like ‘I’m tired’ or ‘I’m fine’ or ‘We need to talk.’

This is my skin and it’s thick. This is not your skin. Yet you are still under it.

Iain S. Thomas, I Wrote This For You (via petrichour)

(Source: larmoyante)

tags → #quotes 

Disney Princesses + Magical Dress Transformations